Home > Themes > Emerging powers > The discursive articulation of the concept of the “rising power”: perceptions, stances and interests in Brazil, Russia and Turkey

Authors

Licínia Simão

Licínia Simão is an assistant professor of International Relations and a researcher at the Centre for Social Studies at the University of Coimbra. Her research interests include Russian foreign policy and the post-Soviet countries. She has contributed to several reports on these issues, includin...
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Teresa Almeida Cravo

Teresa Almeida Cravo is a researcher at the Centre for Social Studies and a lecturer in international relations at the University of Coimbra, Portugal. She holds a PhD in politics and international studies from the University of Cambridge and a master’s in peace studies from the University of Bra...
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André Barrinha

André Barrinha is a lecturer in politics and international relations at Canterbury Christ Church University and a researcher at the Centre for Social Studies at the University of Coimbra.
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Reginaldo Mattar Nasser

Reginaldo Mattar Nasser  is the director of the International Relations Department at the Catholic University of São Paulo and teaches in the Santiago Dantas MA Programme. He has published extensively on international security, conflict in the Middle East and U.S. foreign policy.
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The discursive articulation of the concept of the “rising power”: perceptions, stances and interests in Brazil, Russia and Turkey

Licínia Simão, Teresa Almeida Cravo, André Barrinha, Reginaldo Mattar Nasser, 24 September 2014

The international perception of Brazil, Russia and Turkey as rising (or resurgent) powers was sparked initially by their impressive economic achievements over the past decade and optimistic future prospects. This identity as rising stars on the international scene has been increasingly championed by these countries’ leaderships and welcomed by their domestic constituencies. The realisation that their respective abilities to shape international affairs have lagged behind their economic promise has accelerated these countries’ revisionist agendas. In each case the discourse surrounding the concept of the “rising power” and its attendant identity has been deployed instrumentally to question the undemocratic nature of the established global governance system and support a change in the status quo that is more favourable to the interests and values of the rising powers. This report considers not only the economic potential of Brazil, Russia and Turkey, but also analyses their current endeavours and future prospects for greater geopolitical influence. It argues that the imaginary of the so-called rising power has played a significant role, both internally and internationally, in facilitating and legitimating these countries’ ascendance to world relevance, while also opening up space for political contestation.

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