Home > Regions > Africa > Somalia > Remaking the Somali state: a renewed building-block approach

Authors

Morten Bøås

Morten Bøås is a research professor at the Norwegian Institute of International Affairs. He has written extensively about African politics and development. His publications include the much-cited African Guerrillas: Raging against the Machine  (Lynne Rienner, 2007), co-edited with Kevin Dun...
More

Narve Rotwitt

Narve Rotwitt earned a master degree in political science from the University of Oslo, based on a thesis on Somalia and the Islamic Courts Union. After submitting his thesis in January 2010 he worked as a Research Assistant at Fafo until July 2010. During this period he co-authored two Fafo rep...
More

Related projects

Related publications

a A share Email print

Remaking the Somali state: a renewed building-block approach

Morten Bøås, Narve Rotwitt, 21 September 2010

Executive summary

The record of externally sponsored statebuilding initiatives in Somalia since 1991 is one of failure. Most of these initiatives have sought to restore a unitary state, an effort that has been unsuccessful and will not happen in the immediate future. This report calls for a different way forward – a return to a “building-block” approach to statebuilding, guided by a pragmatic outlook that transfers power to local authorities and civil society. This is not a new idea, for it has been discussed ever since the end of colonial rule in Somalia. The two-stage idea is to break up the territory into smaller pieces – “building-blocks” – that can more effectively be managed by local authorities; then, when these become working polities, reunite them under a decentralised, federal or even confederal structure.
The example of Somaliland (and to a different degree Puntland) gives credibility to such an approach. Somaliland is without doubt the most peaceful and stable part of the country. By adopting a system of governance anchored in the clan-based principles of the predominantly nomadic northern Somali society, in combination with liberal democratic values, it has been able to provide security to its citizens as well as collecting a modest level of taxes. The trajectory that led to Somaliland’s current system of governance cannot necessarily be transplanted automatically to the rest of the country, but this experience of local reconciliation and statebuilding should be given much more attention; in particular, it shows that statebuilding efforts crucially need to be domestically driven and to engage the broader public. This “indigenising” of the statebuilding process both gives legitimacy to local leaders and makes it easier for the population to hold them accountable. The way that parts of Somalia are consolidating their regional polities suggests that a revival of the building-block approach is the best route to finding a lasting solution to the Somali problem.

Featured

Stay informed

Subscribe to notifications from NOREF.

Follow NOREF

Recommended

 
 
BBC
BBC
Iraq investigates alleged abuses by Mosul troops
Iraq investigates alleged abuses by Mosul troops
Syria war: Air strike near Raqqa 'kills 16 civilians'
Syria war: Air strike near Raqqa 'kills 16 civilians'
Robot police officer goes on duty in Dubai
Robot police officer goes on duty in Dubai
 
Al Jazeera
Al Jazeera
Syrian refugee crisis: All your questions answered
Syrian refugee crisis: All your questions answered
Ramadan 2017: First day of fasting expected May 27
Ramadan 2017: First day of fasting expected May 27
US warship challenges China's claims in South China Sea
US warship challenges China's claims in South China Sea
 
CSS
CSS